Disturbing & Scary Books That are Great

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I love scary books and movies even though I tend to really get scared easily. Scary movies I can’t watch alone. But books are great because you can read them in a public space, yet still feel creeped out. I’ve never really been scared by a Stephen King book, so none of those make this list. And there is a big difference between scary & disturbing.


american psycho book by bret easton ellis

Disturbing: American Psycho

The satirical aspect of American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis doesn’t make it any less disturbing. I get that it’s supposed to be repulsive. It’s supposed to make you want to feel sick. And uncomfortable. And uneasy. It’s supposed to be over the top – and it is! It certainly grossed me out several times but the writing never strays from it’s point and overall I’d consider it a great read.

This is one of the few books I remember feeling truly uncomfortable reading in a public place. It was specifically during the second sex scene and it involves…. an animal. And I’m squirming in my seat right now just thinking about it! But reading the details of this insane sexual act plus the gruesome murder following it, I truly felt uncomfortable reading this on the subway.

Here I was sitting next to people on the train, they’re like la la la going to work and I’m next to them reading about a man trapping a rat in a woman’s vagina.

But that kind of awkwardness is, in a way, reassuring. I’d question myself if I just shrugged at it. Plus, it’s pretty amazing to know an author’s words are powerful enough to make me feel such strong emotion. To describe acts so vulgar and disgusting that can still gross me out in this jaded day and age. American Psycho was written in 1991 (though it’s set in the 1980’s). And it’s disturbing factor still holds up over 20 years later. You can’t say that for too many stories (novels, movies, etc).


charles burns graphic novel black hole

Disturbing: Black Hole

Charles Burns illustrations are beautiful and fantastic and creepy as hell. The world he creates in graphic novel Black Hole is incredibly dark. His drawing style, mostly made up of blackness, only adds to that. Burns really brings out emotions in the characters, even if the story isn’t completely straight-forward. The world is confusing, just as some of the characters are emotionally confused. And it works so well.

The illustrations are never quite repulsive but they can be disturbing, which works so well for the plot. This is definitely a story that could only work as a graphic novel. And really, only by Burns.


nos4a2 by joe hill

Scary/Creepy: NOS4A2

At this point, it’s safe to say that I am in love with Joe Hill. I loved his previous novel Horns. And I really loved this one. Parts of this are a little disturbing because it has to do with a serial killer kidnapping children and his assistant doing gruesome things to women. But really the whole thing is creepy and borderline scary in some parts.

This is another book that I felt slightly odd reading on the subway but for a different reason than American Psycho. Although unfortunately both books do involve raping/killing/maiming women. Hill never gets nearly as gruesome in his descriptions and knows exactly when to end it. There was one scene in particular that was so scary/gruesome I found myself wishing I could read it through my fingers – like I do when watching scary movies. Unfortunately reading while half-covering my eyes didn’t work too well. But Hill knows his audience and just a sentence after I started getting too squeamish, the scene concluded smoothly.

What saves NOS4A2 from being disturbing is that part of it takes place in magical areas – or innerscapes as they’re described in the book. There is a supernatural aspect to the book which makes it a bit more creepy than disturbing. Plus, the atmosphere is spooky.

The book is revolved around the serial killer’s home innerscape of Christmasland. If you think about it, Christmas is really creepy! Christmas music, the lights, Santa Claus… if you take it out of context, it’s all creepy. Like, if someone were to seriously listen to Christmas music outside of the month of December, it’d be a little weird.

This atmosphere, especially of turning a holiday that is supposed to be of cheer into this entire world of fear, is just spooky the whole way through. Sure, some scenes are scary in themselves, but there is a lingering creepy tone to all of this, which just really made it a fun read.


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